Christian Parents not suitable to Foster


In a landmark judgment, handed down this afternoon (28 Feb) in which a Christian couple were rejected for fostering because they would not teach a child that homosexuality was normal, the High Court has suggested that Christians with traditional views on sexual ethics are unsuitable as foster carers, and that homosexual ‘rights’ trump freedom of conscience in the UK.

The Judges stated that Christian beliefs on sexual ethics may be ‘inimical’ to children, and they implicitly upheld an Equalities and Human Rights Commission submission that children risk being ‘infected’ by Christian moral beliefs.

Today’s judgment strongly affirms homosexual rights over freedom of conscience and leaves Mr & Mrs Johns currently unable to foster a child as desired, despite their proven track record as foster parents. There now appears to be nothing to stop the increasing bar on Christians who wish to adopt or foster children but who are not willing to compromise their beliefs.

The summary contained in the judgment sends out the clear message that Christian ethical beliefs are potentially harmful to children and that Christian parents with mainstream Christian views are not suitable to be considered as potential foster parents as this does not accord with diversity and equality policies.

READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE HERE: http://christianconcern.com

Laughter Epidemic Definitely NOT “Holy”


This report, clearly not from a Christian church and happening a lot earlier than the outbreak of Rodney Howard Browne’s “Laughter Epidemic” that hit the churches in the 90’s, show conclusively that compulsive laughter is either mass hysteria or actually demonic in origin.

Notice that this effect spread (as the revivalists claim today) “like a virus” from one person to another. Yet in the churches this is claimed to be a work of the Holy Spirit! How deluded would you have to be to accept this as from God?

Tanganyika laughter epidemic

The Tanganyika laughter epidemic of 1962 occurred in or near the village of Kashasha on the western coast of Lake Victoria in the modern nation of Tanzania near the border of Kenya. It is possible that, at the start of the incident, a joke was told in a boarding school, and that this joke triggered a small group of students to start laughing. The laughter perpetuated itself, far transcending its original cause. The school from which the epidemic sprang was shut down; the children and parents transmitted it to the surrounding area. Other schools, Kashasha itself, and another village, comprising thousands of people, were all affected to some degree. Six to eighteen months after it started, the phenomenon died off. The following symptoms were reported on an equally massive scale as the reports of the laughter itself: pain, fainting, respiratory problems, rashes, and attacks of crying.